Road to Monteverde will be ready in 2016, according to MOPT

MOPT representatives said the repair and expansion of the road to Monteverde would be completed sometime in 2016. (Photo courtesy of Vice President Ana Helena Chacón / Facebook)

MOPT representatives said the repair and expansion of the road to Monteverde would be completed sometime in 2016. (Photo courtesy of Vice President Ana Helena Chacón / Facebook)

July 21st, 2014 (InsideCostaRica.com) The repair, paving, and expansion of Route 606, better known as being the main road to Monteverde, should be completed sometime in 2016, according to representatives of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport (MOPT).

 

Area business owners and residents have complained about the poor state of the road for years, and say it affects tourism.

 

Last year, the National Chamber of Tourism (CANATUR) expressed its concern over the road, and said there had been a significant drop in the number of visitors to the popular tourist destination as a result.  Business owners and residents joined CANATUR at the time in demanding that the road be repaired.

 

Monteverde is home to some 220 tourism-related business including hotels, restaurants, tour operators, and others.

 

In June of last year, some 500 Monteverde residents marched on the Interamericana Norte Highway in protest of the condition of the road.

 

 

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  • expatin paradise

    What the average citizens of these scenic areas (Monteverde, beaches in Nicoya) don’t ever seem to understand is that their bad roads help to preserve the quiet and picturesque nature of their environments. Build a good road, and open the floodgates to heavy traffic and unbridled commercial development. I grew up in Florida and witnessed its conversion from mostly quiet small towns to overdeveloped eyesores all along the principal highways – the Ft Myers area exploded once I-75 was completed to connect to the east coast. It is already happening here – as soon as the highway was completed south of Jaco, mega-developments started south of Manuel Antonio. These road projects are great for developers and the tourism industry, but not so good for the other people who live in these areas.

    As usual, people won’t know what they had until it has gone.

    • Frank Castle

      You are so right! I grew up in Southern California and saw the same thing.

      I remember coming to Costa Rica the first time in 1989. It was so different then. The Jungle Train was still in operation between Limon and San Jose and it was a hoot to ride. Taking a bus from San Jose to Golfito was one crazy adventure because it was still so undeveloped. The route from Atenas beyond to the South Pacific coast on La Costera Sur was really crazy with what looked like bomb craters on that route along with the rickety bridges near Quepos. From Quepos south was what then seemed like a dusty washboard like road to sleepy towns like Dominical and those farther south. Roads that are too smooth and easy to drive make it too easy for the Developers to follow.

  • Connie Sandlin

    There goes the neighborhood.