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Strong 6.4 magnitude earthquake in Nicaragua felt throughout Costa Rica

Archive image for illustration purposes.

Archive image for illustration purposes.

March 3rd, 2014 (InsideCostaRica.com) A strong earthquake that measured 6.4 on the Richter scale that struck Nicaragua in the early morning hours of Sunday was also felt in many areas of Costa Rica.

 

The main quake struck at 3:37am on Sunday, off the Pacific coast of Nicaragua’s Chinandega province in the north of the country.

 

The quake was followed by several aftershocks, ranging in magnitude between 5.5 and 4.1 on the Richter scale.

 

An unrelated 4.6 magnitude earthquake also struck at 9:36am on Sunday west of Playa Sámara in Costa Rica.

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  • Derryl Hermanutz

    I felt that Nicaragua quake here in Jaco, at 3:40 or 3:41 a.m., 3 or 4 minutes after the stated time of 3:47 a.m. Could it take that long for the waves to reach here? It was a strong rocker, strong enough to rattle stuff on the shelves. I was sure it was close and shallow and at least a 5.0, but it turns out it was far away and deep and a 6.4.

    • http://insidecostarica.com/ Timothy Williams

      Interesting question so I had to check it out.

      Seems that 3 to 4 minutes would be about right. Seismic waves travel between 2km and 8km/sec in the Earth’s crust it seems. Jaco is about 550km from the epicenter. So on the slower side, (2km/sec) it could take up to 275 seconds, or about four and a half minutes to reach you.

      • Derryl Hermanutz

        Thanks for doing that seismology research, Timothy!