US spying allegations to be reviewed by Americas commission amid fresh uproar

October 22nd, 2013 (AFP & InsideCostaRica.com) – The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights said Monday it will review allegations of US spying in detail during its next period of hearings, which starts next week.

 

The sessions come amid fresh controversy caused by former US security contractor Edward Snowden.

 

Mexico angrily demanded swift explanations Monday about Snowden’s latest leaks, alleging that the United States had spied on millions of phone communications.

 

Information has also come to light that that the United States intercepted thousands of emails of Mexican president, Enrique Pena Nieto.

 

Not even Costa Rica seems to be safe from U.S. spying, according to information revealed in July.  President Laura Chinchilla called for an international debate on U.S. spying at the time.  The reasons behind targeting in Costa Rica are not clear.

 

Allegations of US spying on foreign individuals and governments in the past year “have been of enormous concern” for the commission, said IACHR executive secretary Emilio Alvarez.

 

The allegations have even breached once-strong ties between the United States and Brazil, with President Dilma Rousseff even postponing a long-planned visit to Washington over the matter.

 

IACHR, an independent body of the Organization of American States, will hold its 149th session from October 28 to November 1, hearing 52 of the 217 cases requested.

 

Including its March session earlier this year, the commission will have held 114 hearings in 2013, the highest number in the last six years.

 

“We see it as a sign that the system is strengthened and the participants are reaffirming their confidence in the system, as far as the hearing mechanism is concerned,” Alvarez told reporters.

 

The commission will also weigh in on the prisoner situation at the US detention facility in Guantanamo Bay after hunger strikes there, US immigration reform and judicial independence in Latin America.

 

Other sessions will focus on use of drones, refugee cases in the Americas and freedom of expression in Ecuador, Argentina, Venezuela and Brazil.

 

Colombia will have the most hearings with five cases, mainly over allegations of repression against indigenous people and other groups during social protests. Venezuela, Mexico and the United States each have four cases.

costa rica news

ATTENTION: If you are seeing this message,


Share This Post

Google1GoogleYahoo

More of today’s stories

    • Gary Hogan

      Do we really think that Europe, China, Russia, Iran and Israel are not doing the same type of spying as the USA? The technology is there, and they will use it. It is bothersome to me as an American though, that the US has not defined when spying is justified on our citizens and our friends.

    • Derryl Hermanutz

      Apparently one of the main uses of the intelligence gathered is for industrial espionage. The NSA intercepts communications by foreign companies bidding on international contracts, then passes the intel along to insider US corporations, who adjust their bids accordingly. The “security state” is the “security-industrial” state, which is a collaboration between big government and big business. When Hitler did this it was called “fascism”. When China does this it is called “communism”. When the US does this it is called “capitalism”. Capitalism is not about market competition and free enterprise. It’s about winning, by whatever means are at your command. Spying, lying, and propaganda are 3 of the most well-loved means of winning these high stakes games. So if you see somebody winning in the big leagues, you can be pretty sure they’re deeply involved in the game of power politics, whichever “ism” they prefer to call themselves. Just don’t believe the players are playing for “your” benefit, because they practice what you hear them preaching: Every man for himself. No matter whose flag they hoist over their industrial flotilla.